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Thursday, September 07, 2006

 

The Gutenberg Blog Scavenger Hunt

We are in the middle of an awakening and a renaissance. You might have heard about it. When Gutenberg created the movable type press, he made information more available and accessible. Arguably, that revolution of technology in 1447 served as a catalyst that spread renaissance ideas across Western Civilization.

The Internet has catapulted us into an information age that is doing the same thing. It’s old news really—harkening back to dotcom prophesies in the 1990s—but it’s gotten new spin recently with the Web 2.0 hype about blog marketing and social media. Christian bloggers are even having a convention.

I write this because some of my friends have questioned my sanity of late. I start talking about blogging as worship, and they get these worried looks on their faces. So I’m sending all of them on . . .

A BLOG SCAVENGER HUNT!

Start by clicking on "Comments" at the bottom of this post. Keep the comment window open for recording your scavenger hunt findings.
1) Find a one-sentence nugget of truth about faith and daily life from the comments on RealLivePreacher.com. Paste it into your comment window with the URL or a link if you know html. (If you are interested, read more about Gordon Atkison here.)

2) Find a one-sentence nugget of truth about faith and daily life from the comments on Jesus Creed. Paste it into your comment window with the URL or a link if you know html. (If you are interested, read more about Scot McKnight here.)

3) Find a one-sentence nugget of truth about faith and daily life on It Takes a Church. Paste it into your comment window with the URL or a link if you know html. (If you are interested, read more about Tod Bolsinger here.)

Dig Deeper?

If you want to dig deeper into the strange world of blogging, marketing, and "movable byte" publication, take a look at these links, articles, and posts:

GodBlogCon

Influential Interactive Marketing's 5 Rules of Social Media Optimization

CopyBlogger's Social Proof: Herd It Through the Grapevine and Viral Marketing

Wired Magazine’s Monkey Bites: Web 2.0 Champions and Stinkers

SEO Book's 101 Ways to Build Link Popularity

SEOmoz's 21 Tactics to Increase Blog Traffic


HillCountryWriter Categories: Blogging Church stuff
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Comments:
Sorry - there is more than one sentence and I wasn't sure what you meant by putting the URL, but here ya go. I hope I win!

"A person starts with the raw materials given to her by God or biology or chance or however you want to think about it. What she does with her advantages or disadvantages is her choice. This choosing is a defining moment for humans."
http://www.reallivepreacher.com/node/797#comment

"In some respects it’s easier being a women and just stopping at the walls that have been constructed over time by ‘religion’ and justifying my lack of service as ‘impossible’. Am I willing to scale those walls, or just stand by? Time will tell."
http://www.jesuscreed.org/?p=1424#comments

"How can the Church do better at producing disciples who are not trying to keep up with the Jones across the Pew and down the street? Where are the servant leaders?"
http://bolsinger.blogs.com/weblog/2006/09/a_place_or_a_wa.html#comments
 
Reading the Bible will be hard. You pick it up knowing that it doesn't keep time they way we keep time in the modern world. Parts of it are dated, so it must be wound regularly with study, and its time reset at the morning of every new age.

The Bible is from God: “If anyone ponders over [the scriptures] with all the attention and reverence they deserve, it is certain that in the very act of reading and diligently studying them his mind and feelings will be touched by a divine breath and he will recognize that the words he is reading are not utterances of man by the language of God” (1st Principles 4.1.6).

N.T. Wright has pointed out that the imagery of citizens of heaven was a reference to those ex-patriots (most of the retired Roman soldiers) who were rewarded with land grants and asked to populate the conquered territories at a distance from Rome. These “citizens of Rome” knew that while they lived in far off lands like Philippi and Ephesus, they were to be loyal to Rome and by their influence help turn this territory into Roman stronghold. While the “place” they lived in was a foreign land, the “way” to live was as a Roman.

This is the best I can do.
 
Thanks to Amy and Shep for posting! When I explained the game to my daughter she immediately asked, "What does the winner get?"

Leave it to a five-year-old to point out the obvious.

If five more people comment, I'll let readers vote on whoever they think found the coolest "nuggest of truth." I promise to send a cool gift in the mail to the winner, Camy Tang style.
 
I love your blogs on publishing. Thank you.
 
Actually, I said none of this. I just followed the instructions. Here are the nuggets I found:

"Baring the soul is a risk, but each time one of us does it successfully and honestly, more people realize we are all imperfectly brilliant and struggling creatures who have much more in common than the world wants us to believe."
- visual-voice, Faith enough to believe

"Even (and sometimes ESPECIALLY) our failures are what mold us into the image of Christ."
- Bob Robinson, Vocational Angst

"The value of athletic competition is the insights it gives us about life and how we respond in pressure situations."
- Don, Lessons from Tri-ing Part 6
 
To your opening comment on Gutenberg... you might enjoy perusing the book "Goodbye Gutenberg."
 
leslea, I'm glad you like the blogs on publishing! Those have been less frequent lately because I'm building a new blog just on that topic. It will go live in a few weeks if all goes according to plan...

l.l. barkat, Goodbye Gutenberg sounds very interesting. Especially since I taught English so long. I still remember the controversy when we adopted new textbooks a few years ago. It was clear that the presses were designing literature books with magazine readers in mind. The design/art did make the works more appealing.

And Mark, man, I hope those two hours were fun reading, not compulsory! RLP, Jesus Creed, and Bolsinger are some of my favorite blogs. You're the winner so far!

Thanks to all three of you for reading. (leslea, I've got more publishing posts in the pipeline. Check back next week for thoughts on agents.)
 
Hi Mark;

Yes, very much fun. Alas, I was supposed to be working. :-)
 

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